Quick Answer: Can you get chemo without losing hair?

Is it possible to not lose hair during chemo?

Can hair loss be prevented? No treatment exists that can guarantee your hair won’t fall out during or after chemotherapy. Several treatments have been investigated as possible ways to prevent hair loss, but none has been absolutely effective, including: Scalp cooling caps (scalp hypothermia).

Do all chemo patients lose hair?

Hair loss does not occur with all chemotherapy. Whether or not your hair remains as it is, thins or falls out, depends on the drugs and dosages. Hair loss may occur as early as the second or third week after the first cycle of chemotherapy, although it may not happen until after the second cycle of chemotherapy.

Does hair grow back patchy after chemo?

In many cases, hair eventually returns to the way it used to be after the effect of chemotherapy on the hair follicle wears off. But some people have incomplete hair regrowth. And sometimes permanent baldness and loss of eyebrows and eyelashes can occur, particularly in people who received Taxotere.

What chemo makes you lose hair?

Chemo More Likely to Cause Hair Loss

Alkylating agents: Cytoxan or Neosar (cyclophosphamide), Ifex (ifosfamide), Myleran or Busulfex (busulphan), Thioplex (thiotepa).

IT IS AMAZING:  Which shampoo is best for alopecia?

What is the best shampoo for chemo hair loss?

When it comes to choosing a shampoo specifically for use with a cooling cap, the Live Better With community recommend Paxman hair and scalp care shampoo, which is specially designed for people undergoing chemotherapy.

What does your hair look like after chemo?

Appearance and texture

After chemotherapy, the hair initially grows as thin fuzz. It may stick straight up or be difficult to style. Very fine hair may also not be visible from a distance. Some hair follicles may enter the active growth period before others.

What percentage of chemo patients lose their hair?

Approximately 65% of individuals undergoing chemotherapy will experience chemotherapy-induced hair loss, which is usually temporary and completely reversible when therapy ends. The use of molecularly targeted agents in cancer treatment has also been associated with hair loss rates as high as 60%.